Aeschylus #121

Seated Women in a Garden, Picasso inspiration for Aeschylus #121 Upcoming: Saturday, April 21st, Blake Garden, Kensington with Tonyanna Borkovi. Part of a series of “rituals” curated by Yula Paluy.

Sophocles’ Laocoön in Davenport

after the wooden horse is brought into the city the Trojans celebrated believing the war over A sacrifice to Poseidon for removing the Greeks with Laocoōn a priest of Poseidon ordered to carry it out Cassandra and Laocoön warn of the impending danger within the horse with Laocoön sinning against the gods by attacking the horse…

Nathaniel Justiniano, site responsive, theatre, theater, site specific, Fort Mason, Chapel, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, GGNRA, National Parks, Oedipus, Sophocles, San Francisco, Bay Area, Iota, photography, documentation, Museum of Performance and Design, Muriel Maffre, dance, music, Immersive, Stanford, Arts

Oedipus in Fort Mason Chapel

The staged reading of Oedipus happened last night in Fort Mason Chapel for SF International Arts Festival … I’m biased but i thought it was marvelous and more than anything I’m in awe of the incredible effort intelligence, humor and grace of my collaborators in this all too brief adventure thank you Muriel Maffre, John Warren…

Aeschylus’ Diktyoulkoi (Net Haulers)

the play set on the island of Seriphos with the arrival of Danaë and her infant Perseus Danaë’s father Acrisius had set them adrift in a wooden chest a fisherman nets a large object offshore he seeks the help of Dictys the brother of the local king Polydectes in hauling the chest ashore struggling they…

site specific, theatre, theater, performance, live art, Pillar Point, San francisco, performance, live art, environmental theatre, site responsive, Sophocles, Nausicaä, Chocolate Heads, Stanford TAPS, Stanford theater and performance studies, summer theater, Aleta Hayes, classical drama, theater bay area, Homer, Odyssey, Poseidon, Odysseus, Athena, dance, choreography, stanford arts

Sopohocles’ Nausicaä Perfromance

The Iota and The Chocolate Heads present Sophocles’ lost drama Nausicaä… Afternoon, July 10th, Half Moon Bay Only a few fragments remain from Sophocles original play which was presumably based upon the fifth and sixth books of the Odyssey. The Fragment… …to weave robes and tunics made of linen… The wave passed me by then…

Sophocles Nausicaa, theater, theatre, theater bay area, rehearsal, process, choreography, collaboration, artists, practitioners, Stanford Theater, Stanford TAPS, stanford theater and performance studies, Aleta Hayes, documentation, photography, Judy Syrkin-Nikolau, Prosser, studio

rehearsing Sophocles Nausicaä

  Poseidon vs. Odysseus “Poseidon god of the earthquake launched a colossal wave, terrible, murderous, arching over him, pounding down on him, hard as a windstorm blasting piles of dry parched chaff, scattering flying husks…” The Odyssey, trans. Robert Fagles Sophocles Nausicaä rehearsal with The Chocolate Heads in Stanford Theater and Performance Studies‘ Prosser Studio

Site Specific Theatre, Aeschylus, The Argo, San Francisco, Maritime, national parks, live art, C.A. Thayer, site responsive,

Aeschylus’ The Argo at San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park

The early stages of the Argonaut expedition perhaps even its very beginning The Argo was constructed by the shipwright Argus with the help of Athena In her prow a piece of timber from the sacred forest of Dodona spoke prophecies In the end Argo was consecrated to Poseidon then translated to the sky into the…

James Baldwin: “Take This Hammer” (1963)

“There is no moral distance between the facts of life in San Francisco and the facts of life in Birmingham.” In the summer of 1963, the KQED Film Unit invited author James Baldwin to investigate racism in San Francisco. Baldwin agreed to be filmed while he scrutinized the liberal, cosmopolitan image projected by the city….

16th c. Costume Studies for Sophocles’ “Oedipus Tyrannus”

Paolo Veronese (Italian, 1528 – 1588) created these costume studies in preparation for the inaugural production of Sophocles’ tragic play Oedipus Tyrannus at the Teatro Olimpico in Verona, which took place March 1585. Although he was not credited as the play’s costume designer, the designs on this sheet were apparently consulted and incorporated. Inscriptions on…

site specific dance, san francisco, Ted Shawn

The Mechanics Monument by Douglas Tilden

In April of 1937, in a demonstration that ‘Athletic dance was the future sport of American men”. Ted Shawn and His Men Dancers performed at The Mechanics Monument by Douglas Tilden. The sculpture, located at the intersection of Market, Bush and Battery Streets in San Francisco, was dedicated on May 15, 1901. President Theodore Roosevelt…

Russian Site Specific Theatre in the 1920s

Photographs by Alexander Grinberg (1885-1979,) one of the most respected Russian photographers of the 20th c. His prestige was on the rise throughout the 1920s until 1929 when, under the storm of the cultural revolution the “old school” of Soviet photography came under fire as “depraved”, and Grinberg fell out of favor. His photography was…

Sophocles’ Polyxene (S.77)

the Ghost of Achilles appears warning the Greeks to postpone their departure prophesying disastrous consequences a quarrel develops between Agamemnon and Menelaus resulting in the departure of Menelaus while Agamemnon remains to sacrifice Polyxena The Fragment… MENELAUS Do you remain here somewhere in the land of Ida and round up the flocks of Olympus for…

Site Specific, theatre, performance, Sophocles, Sinon, Emeryville, site response, jamie lyons, todd pivetti, environment, environmental, bay, bay area, art, artists, sculpture, driftwood, bay bridge

Showcase of work so far…

as part of the Collected Works‘ Franconia Performance Salon at the Museum of Performance + Design we’ll be showing the documentation of our performances Saturday, June 27th, 6:30pm @ MP+D 893B Folsom St. San Francisco work to be shown will include… Aeschylus’ Daughters of the Sun Sophocles’ Sinon and Aeschylus’ Glaucus of Pontiae A presentation…

Pasiphaë

Denials from me will no longer convince you; for the facts are now quite clear. If I had thrown myself at a man in love’s furtive commerce, I should rightly now be revealed as lascivious. As it is, because my madness was a god’s onslaught, I hurt, but my trouble is not voluntary. Why, it…

Euripides’ Sciron (E.49)

Satyrs, led as usual by their ‘father’ Silenus, are in servitude to Sciron; they tended, not their master’s animals for his enjoyment, but passers-by whom they lured with prostitutes Sciron then killed these unfortunate men until Theseus came by, destroyed Sciron, and freed the satyrs. The Fragments… SILENUS: Hermes, for you indeed… hold… You can…